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Don’t Lead a Team of Headless Chickens?

Have you ever wondered why some sales teams work a lot and produce near zero results while others over deliver with a lesser effort? Most of the underperforming sales teams are confused, disorganised or at worst utterly aimless. On top of this, they have no clue as to how to measure their progress.

You don’t need to be a Steve Jobs to figure out, that unless sales teams have clearly articulated and agreed on the success metrics, their activities will rarely lead to meaningful results. Now, according to me, metrics is more than the year-end numbers that the sales team needs to clock in, the best companies measure leading indicators and not the lagging indicators. 

To give you an example, At Platformax we don’t put a single revenue number for a sales manager, we break down the journey to a successful sale. As long he/she can replicate multiple journeys the sales number will happen, the month end sales number is an output only. We measure the input steps, and this leads to a predictable sales number.

We work with multiple clients and help them in accelerating their sales number, whenever we onboard a new customer, we look for these symptoms to figure out if there are headless chickens doing rounds in the company.

We are always active

Most of the teams believe that they have been hired to be busy, no that’s the fist stepping stone, you don’t hire people to come and sleep in your office (though I love to catch sleep in the office when I am in Japan). 

The first reaction is to do a lot of work, and the lack of measurement systems doesn’t help them see through these activities and figure out that they are not translating into results. So the sales team may brag about the number of roadshows, cold calls and mailers sent and yet they may be unable to show a clear linkage between what they are doing and the final results that you expect them to achieve. 

During one of our sales acceleration assignments, we found that a sales team member continued to make calls and sending emails during Chinese New Year to clients in Hong Kong.  He made sure that he left a voice message too because most of went to voice mail.

He told us that customers in Asia prefer personal meetings and he has to travel to Hong Kong, as they don’t respond to phone calls. And the best part he had data to prove his point. His manager was logical and got convinced with the data and analysis. As a result, he got a 20k USD approval to travel to Hong Kong!

They lack direction

Lack of well-designed metrics squanders the team’s energy and most of them spray and pray for results to happen. Resources are always scarce, and they need to be allocated efficiently, the metrics help you in funnelling these resources to the most important activities that will lead to results. One of the first things that I do when we work to accelerate a client’s sales is to ask them “what are you working towards” if the jaw drops I know there are headless chickens around.

Inability to recover from failures

My passion is Archery, and I have competed at the national level in Slovenia. I must admit that I was very raw when I first started practising the game, my archery coach Samo Medved ( Samo Bear) had told me “If you fall, it’s not about why you fell, it is about how fast you can get to your feet again. After that see why you fell.”

Even the best sales team will have bad days and encounter failure, the presence of a scorecard in such situations helps the team see that they have steadily improved on the metrics and the failure is just a blip. Teams that do not have such guiding stars find it difficult to adapt to such a long terms perspective and may feel demotivated in such situations.

Using these simple principles, I hope that you will be able to guide your sales team to success. In case you are struggling with your sales numbers, please do write to us at Platformax and we will use our sales Jedi to help you in turning the tide. We have helped numerous clients in increasing their sales by using our proprietary tools and would love to help you too.

17. 1. 2017|Categories: Productivity|

What is killing innovation in your company?

 

Innovation is a buzzword in corporate corridors, and millions of dollars are being spent to find the holy grail of innovation. If the culture in your company is not conducive to innovation, appointing consultants or rebranding will not yield tangible results. Here are the few things that kill innovation.

 

You are living in a capsule

Exposure to cutting-edge ideas and best practices within their industries allows teams to explore their limits and test new ways of working. Unfortunately, some organisations suffer from a silo mindset that insulates them from ideas and individuals that are not from their coterie. The most isolated teams are the ones with the greatest deficits in creative thinking. Not only are they cut off from the flow of new ideas; they also don’t have access to informational networks that can keep them apprised of new ways of working.

When such teams try to innovate, they end up reinventing the wheel, because they are not aware of the new solutions that have been already applied, tested and, improved by their peers or competitors.

 

You suffer from not invented here syndrome

The company and its incumbents may be valuing experience over creative thinking. In this type of work culture, ideas are often killed before receiving a fair hearing and team members are routinely criticised for suggesting solutions that represent a departure from status quo.

 

You punish taking risks

If your company has a trophy wall with headgears of people who made a mistake, you have successfully created a group whose members dread making a mistake. As a result, most of them will be checking and double-checking their actions, because errors are fatal and may lead to annihilation. With consequences of this sort in place, team members quickly learn that they are likely to suffer criticism for proposing new and untested approaches to problems. On the other hand, if they adopt or support solutions suggested by their team members, they avoid the risk of failure. As a result, they will always wait for others to march.

 

In your company Managers call the shots

Newbies and less experienced team members tend to be influenced by the opinions and ideas of their senior and more experienced counterparts. These seniors censor and restrict the innovative ideas coming from juniors or fresher’s on the team. One of the most common tactics used by the seniors is to throw an aggressively timed challenge to the team members to come up with a complete solution when they are just beginning to formulate new ideas. Another commonly used approach is to take the team problem-solving discussion offline to influence the originator of the idea to get off the boat and tow the company line. As a result, the newcomers are reluctant to express new ideas and have great difficulty obtaining a fair hearing for their ideas.

 

Your company lacks drive

Innovation requires a work climate that compels teams to leap beyond barriers and explore new ways of solving the problem. If your business has little expectation from the team, which in turn discourages team members from testing and strengthening their abilities, innovation may be a distant dream. Lack of pressure puts the team at ease and complacency tends to set in such circumstances, which further erodes the drive.

 

Your company has limited or no interaction between teams

Innovation is a synergistic process that thrives in a work culture where team members learn from and build on each other’s ideas. This type of symbiotic learning may take many forms, from team members who exchange ideas on a particular project, to the team leader who shares an exciting research with the group. Innovation gets severely handicapped when team members lack ready access to one another or if team norms and practices discourage them from freely discussing their ideas without any humiliation.

12. 1. 2017|Categories: Productivity, Sales tips|

The Four Stages Through Which Team Grows

 

I have handled multiple assignments for our clients; most of them necessitated building ‘on-the-ground’ team that worked for them. At Platformax our customers trust us with their biggest problem, lacklustre sales or dwindling orders. We sift through the maze, automate the sales processes and help them tame the sales beast.

Through this article, I am sharing my experience on how the ‘on-the-ground’ teams evolve. As the team matures, members gradually learn to cope with the emotional and group pressures they face. The team goes through these somewhat predictable stages.

 

Stage 1: Forming the team

When a team is being formed, members cautiously test the boundaries of acceptable group behaviour. This stage reminds me of hesitant swimmers, they stand by the pool, dabbling their toes in the water. At this stage, they are moving from individual to a member status and analyzing their team leaders guidance officially and unofficially.

In the Forming stage these feelings surface:

  • Excitement, adaptation and optimism
  • Satisfaction in being selected for the assignment
  • Provisional sense of team belongingness
  • Doubt, fear and nervousness about the job ahead

In Forming phase, team exhibits these behaviours

  • Endeavours to state the tasks and agree how it will be fulfilled.
  • Efforts to define agreeable group behaviours and how to deal with group problems.
  • Decisions on what information needs to be collected.
  • Lofty, intellectual discussions on models & concerns; and some team members may be exasperated with these dialogues.
  • Discussions of symptoms or problems not relevant to the task; struggling in identifying appropriate problems.
  • Objections about the organisations and barriers to the task.

 

At this stage of the team formation, activity abounds and sidetracks the member’s attentiveness; the team makes minimal achievement in its project goals. Don’t panic; most of the teams go through this phase.

 

Stage 2: Storming

Storming is the most difficult stage for the team. It is as if the team members jump in the water and thinking they are about to drown, start panicking by flipping their limbs. They start to realise that the task is difficult and more burdensome than what they imagined it to be. This makes them tetchy, blameful and at times overzealous.

The lack of advancement fuels resentment, but they are still raw to figure out the next steps in decision-making; they feverously debate about the course of action the team must take. They heavily rely on their past experience and skillfully resist any need for inter-team collaboration.

In the Storming stage these feelings surface:

  • Opposition to the task and the methodology being recommended by other team members.
  • Snappy oscillations in their perception of the team and the project’s ability to deliver on commitments.

 

In Storming phase team exhibits these behaviours

  • Disagreement among members even when they agree on real issues
  • Defensiveness and competition, factions and choosing sides
  • Probing the prudence of people who selected this assignment and assigned other members to it.
  • Establishing unworkable goals; concerns about disproportionate work
  • A perceived pecking order, dissent, increased strain and distrust

 

As a result of these pressures, team members get drained and are unable to progress towards the desired results. However, they start understanding each other in a much better way.

 

Stage 3: Norming

In the norming stage, members resolve opposing devotions and duties.

The members wholeheartedly accept the team; agree to the norms and get comfortable with the role assigned to them, and graciously accept the individuality of other team members.

Emotional conflict and its draining effect on the team members shrinks as cooperation replaces competitiveness in the team. In other words, as team members realise that they are not going to drown, they stop thrashing about it and start helping each other’s stay afloat.

In the Norming stage these feelings surface:

  • Knack of expressing criticism in a constructive manner
  • Acceptance of membership in the team
  • Relief that it seems everything is going to work out

 

In Norming phase team exhibits these behaviours

  • An attempt to achieve accord by sidestepping situations that give rise to conflict
  • Increased friendliness, sharing personal challenges and deliberating about the team dynamics
  • A sense of team cohesion
  • Establishing and maintaining team ground rules and boundaries

 

As team members begin to iron out the differences, they free up more time and energy for the project, thereby making measurable progress on the team goals.

 

Stage 4: Performing

By this stage, the team has settled its relationship issues and expectations. They now begin performing, analyzing and cracking problems. By this stage team members have discovered and are comfortable with each other’s strengths and weaknesses. They start playing with each other’s strengths instead of fighting over their shortcomings.

 

In the Performing stage these feelings surface:

  • Team members have insights into personal and group processes and better understanding of each other’s strengths and weaknesses
  • Satisfaction at teams progress

 

In Performing phase team exhibits these behaviours

  • Constructive self-change
  • Ability to prevent or work through group problems
  • Close relationship within the team

 

In this phase, the team starts acting as a consolidated unit. The pace of work and results gather momentum in this stage.

 

Every team goes through this cycle. The duration of each of the phases vary for each team, depending on how quickly they progress, work through obstacles or problems and so forth. At Platformax, we reinforce that these phases are normal and a sign of progress.

10. 1. 2017|Categories: Productivity, Sales tips|

The Four Golden Rules of Improvement

 

I must admit that I am a bit cynical when I see my pet dog, Adi, chasing his tail and running in circles. Now that reminds me of the way most companies run sales improvement projects. They keep on going round and round in circles with no end in sight, and the management rewards them for their efforts too.

Over the years, we have helped multiple companies in structuring their sales process. And we were not the first ones to get these assignments; the companies on an average had changed the head of sales thrice before they came knocking on our door. In most of the cases they were doing the same mistakes time and again and expecting different results, changing people does not shoo away the problem, the problem just passes over to a new incumbent. From my experience, these are the four golden rules of improvement, if you follow these principles, you will increase your chances of success by multiple times.

 

Start with meaningful data

Collecting useful data is the foundation of success, and the irony is that too often, teams collect inappropriate data or make poor collection procedures. Since they have never been shown how to recognize such mistakes, they base their decisions on unreliable data and end up failing to bring about the desired improvement. They collect more data and make more improvement without realizing that they are looking for apples in an orange orchard.

Collecting meaningful data in the first place can save you months of effort, doing this is not too complicated either. The golden rule is first to know exactly what you want to collect, using standard definitions so that everyone takes the measures the same way.

 

Be a Badger, dig deeper for root-cause

It is easier to react to the visible symptoms rather than searching for the underlying cause. The best way is to use a fishbone diagram or the five why method to explore the potential sources of the problems. You should have patience and avoid zeroing on to the first possible solution, however, plausible and palatable that may look.

 

Develop relevant solutions

The curse of being intelligent is that it forces most of us to pre-empt solutions or root-cause of the problem even before starting the solutions or data gathering phase, sometimes we may be correct too. However, this can be an exception and not the norm. In my experience, the right solution that fixes the problem for once and all is never evident at the first stage.

 

Plan and make changes

There is an adage, which says, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail“. However, over the years we have got attuned to “Ready, Fire and aim” instead of “Ready, aim and fire.” This attitude is slippery and encourages people to act even if it is not the right thing to do. The key to making strides at work is to have your teams look ahead, anticipate resources needed for a successful project and think about the steps to take if they hit a wall.

6. 1. 2017|Categories: Productivity, Sales tips|

Is Your Sales Team Fit For Challenges?

It is not uncommon for a sales team to run into occasional unanticipated challenges. Considering the times in which we live, sales leaders cannot plan for every eventuality. On the other hand, if your team is often choked with unforeseen events, you may want to develop stronger early warning systems. The best sales leaders know that being successful is closely related to securing timely information about circumstances that can affect their performance. Having an early warning system is more than just looking ahead, your team must be ready to respond quickly and with flexibility to the changes in the environment.

A team that lacks foresight often miscalculates the impact of external and internal changes. The team members may see a variety of potential problems in an impending merger but never consider the growth opportunities that will accompany the change. They are obsessed with threats and miss to see the opportunities. And opportunities don’t lie dormant; they are frequently gobbled up by your competitors, who may be adept at profiting from team’s lack of foresight or preparedness.

Depending upon your team’s position about the agility of response and adjustability, they can be classified as Happy, Jumping Jack, Let’s do it or Platformax.

 

Happy team

“Happy teams” live in denial. When they face a significant change, they either ignore it or convince themselves that it’s just passing by the phenomenon. They firmly believe that the hiccup is a temporary aberration and soon enough things will return to normalcy. It goes without saying that such teams display an extreme degree of rigidness. Once they chart out on a course, they keep on marching ahead, irrespective of any new or adverse information that may suggest a need for midterm course correction.

 

Jumping Jack team

The second kind of team that you witness is the “Jumping Jack” team.   They are usually slow to respond and take action after the situation is obvious. While they believe that the situation warrants change, they demonstrate a minimum amount of adjustability. They make small changes to the original plans and are convinced that the original plan was robust enough to tackle this unforeseen event. Jumping Jack teams focus their energies on the past rather than the future. The team members subtly deflect questions about planning or future actions and are quick to explain that they are too busy putting out fires, which need immediate attention.

 

Let’s do it team

The third kind of team that you may have seen is the “Let’s do it” team, these teams go ahead with change and consider the possible implications of events as they unfold. However, they are myopic in nature and plan for events that are just beginning to appear on the horizon. Mostly, they miss the business implications of large-scale changes as they concentrate on an event that concerns their unit only.

 

Platformax team

The fourth and the best team to tackle unforeseen challenges is to build a “Platformax team”. Irrespective of their day-to-day work pressures, they continually scan the horizon to track trends and performance of their companies. They invest a considerable amount of effort in thinking through and preparing for all contingencies, and wherever possible they attempt to influence the course of business events. They anticipate and make an endeavour to shape the change, rather than waiting to be engulfed by it.

 

We have helped numerous entrepreneurs in structuring their sales process. In case you want to build a Platformax sales team, drop me a note and our Sales Jedi will conjure the best team for you.

3. 1. 2017|Categories: Productivity, Sales tips|

How to Give Feedback to Your Sales Team

Feedback is essential to any team’s success and more so for the sales team. Without feedback, the team continues doing the same act over and over again and wishfully expects different results.

Giving feedback is not an easy task, and most of the sales managers are not good at it. From my experience of building large teams and helping a number of entrepreneurs in structuring sales processes to drive revenue, here are quick pointers on how to give feedback to your sales team.

 

Be Descriptive

While giving feedback to the sales team, relate, as objectively as possible to what you saw the other person do or what you heard him say. Give specific examples from recent past; avoid giving feedback, which is dated, as it would lead to disagreement.

 

Avoid using labels

Be clear, specific and unambiguous. Words like immature, unprofessional, irresponsible and prejudiced are labels we attach to sets of behaviour. While giving feedback, describe the behaviour, but avoid labelling them. For example, you could say, ” You missed the deadline we had all agreed to meet” rather than saying “You are irresponsible and I want to know what are you going to do about it?’

 

Avoid exaggerating

While giving feedback to your sales team, it’s best not to exaggerate things, saying, ” You are always late for deadlines” may not be true and hence will be seen as unfair. By exaggerating, you invite the person receiving the feedback to start an argument rather than looking at the real issue.

 

Avoid being Judgmental

By using words as good, bad, better, worst and should, you position yourself as a controlling parent. The usage of these control words, make the person receiving the feedback respond the way a child responds. Once the parent and child loop gets started, you end up in shutting the other person down and squander the opportunity to coach.

 

Avoid speaking for others

While giving feedback, avoid using references to people who are not present that point of time. For example, avoid making statements like ” A lot of people here don’t like it when you….”. You should avoid becoming a conduit for other people’s feedback; they need to deliver it themselves, instead of channelizing it through you.

 

Avoid using the word you

By giving feedback to another person with statements that start with you, the defense gets triggered, and they are less likely to absorb what you are saying. Take a look at these four statements

  1. You are generally late for meetings
  2. You are always on time for meetings
  3. I feel annoyed when you are late for meetings
  4. I appreciate that you come to meetings on time

The first two statements convey a parent-child dialogue, and the other two express an adult/peer relationship. Even if you stand higher in the pecking order than the receiver of the feedback, strive to maintain an adult/peer relationship.

 

Avoid phrasing the issue as a question

By phrasing your feedback as a question, you are giving a signal to the respondent that they better change their behaviour. See the difference in these two statements

  1. When are you going to stop being late for the meetings?
  2. I don’t feel good when you are late for meetings.

The statement one tends to make people defensive and angry while the statement number two implies that there is an issue that must be resolved jointly.

I have used this mantra to give feedback to my sales team; my team has overachieved results over the years. In case you need help in pumping up your sales number, give me a shout and our sales Jedi will be at your service.

29. 12. 2016|Categories: Productivity|

How Platformax Team Manages Complex Projects

At Platformax we handle complex sales improvement projects, many at times we help our clients look for a needle in a haystack to improve their sales numbers. Over the years our team has perfected a delivery process that helps us stay ahead of the pack. Through this article, I am sharing them with you. We weave the following in every project that we run at Platformax.

 

Communicate, Communicate & Communicate

Time and again I have seen that the success of the project depends on how well the team members communicate not only among themselves but also to anyone likely to be affected or interested in their activities. For example, if a team was about to collect data from a working production line, team members should notify all supervisors and operators in advance and tell them when the data will be collected. Similarly, a team studying how employees in an office use their time should explain that the goal is to identify inefficient systems and not lazy employees. By following this mode of communication, we at Platformax get cooperation from our colleagues and often get suggestions for improvements along the way.

Whenever we are implementing Platformax sales improvement projects at our client’s office, we make sure that we don’t stick to notifying people about the changes, but go beyond and explain why the changes are being done and how it will impact them for good in the short as well as long-term.

 

Don’t wait to plug the hole

Over the years after handling multiple sales improvement projects, I know for sure that when you get better at studying processes, you start unearthing a lot more problems that need to be fixed. Our approach at Platformax is to explore issues in depth and collecting enough data for solving it once and for all. However, many times, some problems are easily fixable and don’t need elaborate analysis, this is what our team calls “Platform-sense”, we fix it then and there without getting into a paralysis of analysis. Our sales Jedi recommends that our team answers these questions before applying their “Platform-sense.”

  1. What’s the worst that could happen if this solution doesn’t work?
  2. How easy is it to undo the change?
  3. Will this delay other actions?
  4. How expensive will this change be regarding money and time?
  5. How much disruption will this change cause to our colleagues and clients?

In case most of these answers tread on the downside, we don’t implement the solution in haste. If the solution is simple to put in place and can be undone easily, we give it a shot.

  

We swim upstream like Salmon

Most of the problems we see are symptoms of other problems buried upstream in the process. For example variation in the product line may be due to the variation in raw materials; mistakes in customer’s bill may be the result of errors in the original order. To make improvements that stick, you must seek out these causes and find ways to prevent them. Whenever your team is faced with a problem, mentally walk through the entire process and see if you can identify upstream conditions that could be the cause of the problem.

 

Documentation wins hands down

In most of the organisations the same problem gets solved over and over again, and every time a hero gets created. At Platformax we are lazy and get bored if we have to solve the same problem twice, to feed our laziness we have created a log of the all the problems that we encounter and the proposed and implemented solutions along with end results. This has created a treasured repository for us, and we pride ourselves in discovering and solving new problems.

 

If you don’t measure it, it is smoke and mirrors

At Platformax we are great fans of Einstein, he said, “Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts.” We are not obsessed with measurement, and we have banned people from carrying measuring tapes to our client’s office, however keeping track of where we are and what we do is a part of our core ethos.

Rarely do things turn out exactly the way you plan, and you have to make multiple changes to the process before hitting the optimum point. We monitor all our actions so that we can quickly catch errors and prevent them from snowballing into blunders.

22. 12. 2016|Categories: Productivity, Project management|

Five Signs That Your Sales Head Needs To be Fired

A long time ago, in the land of Persia, there was a small business selling nuts and dry fruits, the owner, Emir Saladin was happy that the sales were picking up and he looked forward to growing his business to prosperous cities of Samarkand, Bukhara, Balkh, and Bamiyan.  To fulfill his dreams, he hired a sales manager called Zabala and started counting his chickens, hoping that the sales would increase and he would be the biggest fruit trader from his city of Isfahan. Time went past, winter came and went, and then the numbers started dipping, his old loyal employees were also unhappy, there was no passion left and customers had started complaining and not paying.

Emir Saladin had never tasted defeat and was known in the city of Isfahan as the best archer in the Persian Empire, so much so that the King of Persia wanted him to train his children on Archery. Emir Saladin, being a simple man with no love for power and fame, quietly concentrated on expanding his fruit business and moved to the city of Isfahan from Damghan, the capital of Persia in those days.

Things started going from bad to worse, and Emir Saladin became very depressed due to the turn of things, especially after Zabala had joined as the sales head. One day at midnight, he got up from his home and started walking towards The Maidan- The City Square.  It was a cold night, and he could barely see anyone else on the streets, as he got closer to the Maidan, he saw another person wearing a robe and walking at very slow pace; it seemed that he was an old man. Upon getting closer to him, Emir Saladin exchanged pleasantries and continued walking beside him.

Emir Saladin did not recognize him; he was Dann, the owner of best sales training firm in Persia, known to everyone as Platformax. After walking by his side for few minutes and as the light from the flames of minarets lit his face, Emir Saladin recognized him and burst into joy; he knew all his problems could be solved if Dann gave him his advice. His joy was short-lived as Dann’s charges were very high and he would not be able to pay it, considering the way his sales number were.

Emir Saladin’s teacher had taught that it’s always good to ask and see how the other side responds. If you don’t ask, you don’t get. Emir Saladin decided to ask Dann for a favor and use that advice to improve his business.

Emir Saladin asked, “ What are the signs which tell you that a company should fire it’s sales head?” to Dann. Dann took a heavy breath and said that a Sales Yoda from another galaxy had once told him this answer.

He looked at Emir Saladin, and gave him an ear bud and asked him to clean his ears and then splashed water in his eyes and said, “now that your ears are clean of wax and eyes watered, look for these signs.”

Your sales head practices micromanagement

Micromanagement is a common symptom of poor member leader relationships. A leader who practices micromanagement treats highly experienced and skilled salespeople as if they were novices, double or triple checks work, or places rigid and excessive restraints on the decision making of team members. To someone looking at the team from the outside, it would appear that all decisions and information are being channelized through a very narrow managerial portal. As the team leader frantically attempts to maintain tight control over an ever-increasing array of projects and problems, workflow slows down significantly.

Your Sales head has communication problems
Troubled sales team members and sales head relationship are sometimes characterized by the opposite condition, where the team leaders provide insufficient direction to their teams. Team members may receive vague or ambitious instructions on projects. They may also discover that the team leader has failed to relay instructions or provide an overall context that enables them to understand the larger work issues involved. For their part, team members conceal mistakes and fail to disclose difficult situations. Eventually, these small failures in communication may result in unpleasant surprises for both the team leaders and its members.

Your sale head has increased team stress levels

Team members depend on their leader for feedback, coaching, guidance and recognition. Deteriorating sales head and sales team relationship produce a high degree of stress. A tense and hostile relationship between team members and their leader may cause some members to view the sales managers office as enemy territory. Also, the sales manager plays a major role in guiding members through times of volatile organization change. Members who lack strong bond with their leader are less prepared to deal with such change and will regard it as a stressful, unmanageable experience.

In time, team members will begin to display all the classic symptoms of work burnout, such as low energy level and the inability to concentrate on complicated tasks. When conversing with other groups, they may appear tense and curt. A concurrent symptom is a rise in absenteeism among team members, which is usually characterized by frequent one-two day absences.

Lack of trust within the team

Sales team member and their leaders may experience increased levels of mistrust. When this happens sales team members will respond to their sales head’s suggestions or explanations of altered requirements with lots of skepticism and suspicion, while the leader may be dissatisfied with the sales team’s justification of poor performance or missed milestones. Both the sides covertly hide behind each other’s defenses to try to find out the real story.  As time passes, the sales team members and their leader may respond to the worsening situation by curtailing all communication.

It is our camp versus their camp

Eventually, when the relationship is in its last round, sales team members and the sales head will separate into opposing camps. In discussions with other work groups, both the sides will complain to their respective peers about the difficulty they are experiencing with the other party. In some cases, team members begin to view their leader as no longer being a part of the team itself. So much so that when the sales leader walks into the room, informal conversations will cease or become guarded.

Armed with excellent advice from Dann who ran the most leading sales improvement platform, Platfromax, Emir Saladin breathed a sigh of relief. He had absolute clarity on what he needed to do. Zabala had to go and find another pasture.

This was in medieval ages; if you are still struggling with doing your sales number and keep on changing the sales team like diapers, give us a call. We will define and automate your sales process. I promise you, Dann, the Platformax guru will run it for you.

12. 10. 2016|Categories: Sales tips|

How to Avoid Giving Concessions in Negotiations

A skilful negotiator will try to trade a concession, which in fact costs him a little, but which has real or high-implied value to the buyer and brings a relatively more valuable concession from them. A great deal of skill is required on the part of the seller in raising the apparent cost to him and value to the buyer of a concession he is trading. Concessions must be traded carefully; this is to say you must not take your hands off your concession until the buyer has agreed on what he will do in return. Let’s look at the ways and tactics to achieve this end game.

Don’t harden your stance

In many respects, a negotiation is a vital game played for real results. Any unduly and early attempts by either side to harden its stand or dig in their heels by being inflexible will be met by reciprocal inflexibility from the other side, and the negotiation will break down. It is critical in these cases that at the conclusion of the negotiation both sides agree they cannot reasonably bridge the gap between them at this stage, or in this instance.  Having such a conclusion leaves open the possibility of further negotiation on the same subject or new negotiations in another area.

Keep the door open

A breakdown in negotiation caused by the unreasonable inflexibility of one party will not leave the possibility of new negotiations for the future so open.  At all times even when you have reached a point beyond which you are not prepared to go, you must appear to be reasonable.  Keep in mind that you are playing a ritual game, which is firmly rooted in hard financial reality. For many buyers, much of their sense of achievement comes from playing the game well.

Some quick tips

The definition of successful negotiation from the seller’s perspective is one which ends on your side of the point of need balance. However, the buyer believes that the deal favours him. You can use some of these hints to tilt the balance in your favours and avoid high concessions without getting anything in return.

  1. Allow the buyer to do most of the talking in the early stages, but do not frustrate him by not answering all his questions.
  2. Move the discussion from opening stances to a clear statement of actual stances, taking care to limit your losses; it is your responsibility to save face for the buyer.
  3. Avoid taking a premature stance at any point, which might result in reaching a point of no return too early in the negotiation. It is easier for the buyer to walk away then it is for you in most circumstances.
  4. Try to close on a clear statement of the actual gaps between you.
  5. Trade any concessions one at a time, ensuring that you raise the value of your concessions to him above their cost to you. You have to make a small concession on your side, seem very large gain to him. You can do this by
  • Implying that you really cannot give it.
  • Avoid emotional reactions but satisfy the buyer’s emotional needs. The good buyer/negotiator will try to put you under emotional pressure.
  • By referring to the main problem that will be solved by the concession.
  • Refer to the saving gained by the buyer.
  • Calculate the financial results of the concession.
  • Build up the notional cost or opportunity cost of giving the concession.
  • Start by implying that you are going to give a small concession and then give a large one, or enlarge the small concession.
  • Persuade the buyer that the benefits of the deal without the concession still justify acceptance.
  • Summarise the problem area and offer alternative concessions or a choice of alternatives
  • Show that the concession would put the buyer at a disadvantage, for example, you may not be able to support the product because of low margins.

With each and every concession made, whether from you or the buyer, it is essential that you summarise the details agreed. This will prevent misinterpretations later.  Consider a negotiation successful, if both you as the seller and the buyer meet at the point of balance, wherein both you and the buyer are satisfied.

Srđan Mahmutović is an Entrepreneur and business developer. He has built Spletnik from scratch, starting with zero investment, taking it from barely making ends meet to becoming the highest growth company in the segment in Slovenia. He is an expert sales manager, at only 19 years of age, Srdan had built a sales network of 40 insurance reps for an insurance network.

1. 10. 2016|Categories: Sales tips|

How To Recruit A Great Sales Manager

Undoubtedly sales are the lifeline of any organization and a cure for most of its problems. Most of the startups die a premature death due to lack of sales and not marketing, contrary to what many would believe. Taking this forward, having a great sales manager is essential to building a successful business.

Having said that, finding a great salesperson is fraught with risk, as few know about the secret traits that make a good salesperson. Many people with the gift of gab masquerade as a salesperson; however, if you dig a bit deeper, the veil gets lifted. From my experience of starting an insurance sales company at the age of 19 in Slovenia, and building it up to the number one position in five years, I can say with conviction that a successful salesperson has unique traits. I believe these qualities and not the education background or fluency in English differentiate the good from the not so good ones. Now, I am going to spill the beans and tell you about the traits of a successful salesperson.

Great Sales Managers Have Solid Conviction

A good sales manager must be able to lead the team in an exemplary fashion; his personal behavior must be above board all the times. Most of the sales people join as trainees or cadets at a very young age. They are highly susceptible to their manager’s behaviors and unconsciously adapt it. They do so because for them the sales manager is the role model and most of them aspire to be there. A good sales manager must depict honesty, sincerity, and truthfulness in dealing with people so that his behavior inspires his team in the right way.

Great Sales Managers Have Unflinching Consistency

Elbert Hubbard, the famous American writer, says it very well, “Self-discipline is the ability to do what you should do when you should do it, whether you feel like it or not.”

Good sales managers loathe procrastination and prefer to do things rather than looking for excuses for not doing it. By using the power of self-discipline, great sales managers cultivate a mindset wherein they are controlled and ruled by their deliberate choices rather than by external circumstances, emotions or other’s whims and fancies. A good sales manager would instill the virtues of self-discipline in the team thereby making them singularly focused on generating leads and following the process to convert them to billing dollars.

Great Sales Managers Have Solid Conviction

Great sales manager do not feel the urge to defend their conviction and in the same spirit display the openness to accept contrary or others’ point of view, without slipping into the judgmental mode. Good sales manager have a strong conviction in what they want to achieve and script an action plan to achieve it in full, without getting swayed or distracted by other’s opinion.

If you want to build a great sales team, go and fund a sales leader with an “I must get it” mindset.

Great Sales Managers Have Emotional Maturity

Sales environment tend to be stressful; pressure tends to build up quickly and to top it up the billing counter resets to zero at the start of every financial year. When novice sales managers encounter stressful selling situations, their emotions come to the forefront and start running the sales meeting instead of using a combination of influence and selling skills to turn the tide.

Good sales managers have the emotional maturity to deal with sudden changes, uncontrollable circumstances and unexpected demands from customers, without losing their composure. Sales managers with emotional maturity tend to achieve their objectives faster than those who lack it, and at the same time, it helps them in building a great relationship with customers and their internal sales team.

By using these tips, I hope you will be able to find a good sales manager. In case you need any help or guidance in refining your sales process, don’t hesitate to contact me for help. I have coached hundreds of successful executives on sales and my company; Platformax is packaging these sweet little secrets in artificial intelligence software, thereby making it easier for people to close sales.

Srđan Mahmutović is an Entrepreneur and business developer. He has built Spletnik from scratch, starting with zero investment, taking it from barely making ends meet to becoming the highest growth company in the segment in Slovenia. He is an expert sales manager, at only 19 years of age, Srdan had built a sales network of 40 insurance reps for an insurance network

11. 9. 2016|Categories: Productivity, Sales tips|